South East Asia

The Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology at Leiden University has several experts on South East Asia.

  

Indonesia

  • Dr. Bart Barendregt lectures on Southeast Asian culture and society, popular and digital culture, and media anthropology. He has published and made films on Southeast Asian performing arts, new and mobile media and popular music. Since 1992 Barendregt has conducted fieldwork in Java, Sumatra, Malaysia and the Philippines.

    He is also affiliated to the Royal Institute for Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KITLV-KNAW) as a senior researcher, coordinating a four year project funded by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). This project, Articulation of Modernity, focuses on societal change through the prism of popular music, emphasizing the appeal of modernity rather than that of the nation-state. It offers a new way of studying Southeast Asia that foregrounds the movement of people, music, ideas, and technologies among the region’s cosmopolitan centers. Within the framework of this project, Barendregt is working on his book about Nasyid: Islamic boy band music and the mixing of religion, youth culture and politics that has become so popular among Malaysian and Indonesian student-activists.

    Additionally dr. Barendregt is affiliated to another NWO project as a senior researcher: The Future is Elsewhere: towards a Comparative History of Digital Futurities, in which he is looking at Islamic ideas of Information society, halal software and appropriation and localization of digital technology in an overt religious context. Together with Dr. Ariel Heryanto (Australian National University) Bart is editor of Southeast Asia Mediated, a 'KITLV Verhandelingen series' that is published with Brill Publishers.

    Bart Barendregt is member of the academic committee of the conference Voices of Asian Modernities. The first conference was held from 4 till 6 September 2013. It is hosted by the research profile Asian Modernities and Traditions (AMT) within the project 'Women, Gender, and Sexuality in Asian Popular Music of the 20th Century'. The Voices of Asian Modernities project is a consortium between AMT, KITLV, and the University of Pittsburgh.

    Keywords: Southeast Asia, anthropology of information society, Islam, popular culture.

  • Prof. Gerard Persoon holds the IIAS chair for Environment and Development in particular in relation to indigenous peoples in Southeast Asia. He has a background in anthropology and environmental science. His research focus is on human-environment interaction in various types of environments but mainly of forest-dwelling peoples in Indonesia and the Philippines. He has been involved in numerous research and training projects in the Southeast Asian region and he has also been involved in nature conservation projects. He has published on development processes among indigenous peoples, co-management and conservation of natural resources, and issues related to island societies.

    PhD research projects that are supervised by him include the role of indigenous peoples in biodiversity conservation and natural resource management in Indonesia, the Philippines and Taiwan, the exploitation of non-timber forest products, the management of marine and inland fisheries, and the modernization of pastoralism. He is a member of the Dutch governmental committee for sustainable timber and a number a other organizations in the field of environment and development.

    Keywords: Environmental anthropology, nature conservation, human-environment interactions, natural resources management.
  • Dr. Ratna Saptari studied anthropology at the University of Indonesia (MA 1984) and at the University of Amsterdam (PhD 1995). She has organized several panels and conferences in collaboration with research/teaching institutions in Europe and Asia focusing on topics such as labour, migration, domestic service, social movements and histories of subaltern groups.

    In addition to several articles and book chapters on these themes, she has also co-edited a number of books: The Household and Beyond: Cultural Notions and Social Practices in the Study of Gender in Indonesia; Labour in Southeast Asia: Local Processes in a Globalized World; and on the politics of history-writing Pemikiran Kembali Penulisan Sejarah Indonesia (Rethinking Indonesian History-Writing).

    Ratna Saptari is currently writing on 'The Making and Remaking of the Cigarette Labour Communities in East Java: a comparative study of three cigarette towns, 1913-2003’; ‘Decolonisation and Urban Labour in Indonesia (1920s to 1965): Continuity and Change’ and ‘The Cultures of Tobacco in Indonesia and India.’

    Keywords: Migration, Social Movements, Labour, Gender, Oral History, South East Asia.

  • Prof. Patricia Spyer holds the chair of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology of Contemporary Indonesia at Leiden University and was Global Distinguished Visiting Professor (2009-2012) at New York University’s Center for Religion & Media and Department of Anthropology. From June – July 2014 she will be a Visiting Fellow at the Humanities Research Centre of the Australian National University (ANU) during the theme year “Now Showing” dedicated to research on visual and digital culture. In November Patricia will visit the ANU again to give a keynote lecture at a conference on “Visual Cultures of Place-making in a Precarious Age.” Patricia Spyer is one of the coordinators of the research profile Asian Modernities and Traditions.

    She is the author of The Memory of Trade: Modernity’s Entanglements on an Eastern Indonesian Island (Duke 2000), editor of Border Fetishisms: Material Objects in Unstable Spaces (Routledge 1998). She co-edited the Handbook of Material Culture (Sage 2006, paperback edition 2013) and, with Mary Margaret Steedly, Images That Move (SAR Press 2013). See Images that Move.

    In January 2014 she will be joining the editorial committee of the Annual Review of Anthropology for a five-year term.

    Publications
    Patricia Spyer has published, among other topics, on violence, media and photography, historical consciousness, materiality, and religion. Her latest book project Orphaned Landscapes focuses on the mediations of violence and postviolence in the recent religiously-inflected conflict in the Moluccas, Indonesia.


Research projects
Ongoing research projects include:

Keywords: Media, visual and material culture, religion, violence, Indonesia.

Malaysia

Dr. Bart Barendregt lectures on Southeast Asian culture and society, popular and digital culture, and media anthropology. He has published and made films on Southeast Asian performing arts, new and mobile media and popular music. Since 1992 Barendregt has conducted fieldwork in Java, Sumatra, Malaysia and the Philippines.

He is also affiliated to the Royal Institute for Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KITLV-KNAW) as a senior researcher, coordinating a four year project funded by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). This project, Articulation of Modernity, focuses on societal change through the prism of popular music, emphasizing the appeal of modernity rather than that of the nation-state. It offers a new way of studying Southeast Asia that foregrounds the movement of people, music, ideas, and technologies among the region’s cosmopolitan centers. Within the framework of this project, Barendregt is working on his book about Nasyid: Islamic boy band music and the mixing of religion, youth culture and politics that has become so popular among Malaysian and Indonesian student-activists.

Additionally dr. Barendregt is affiliated to another NWO project as a senior researcher: The Future is Elsewhere: towards a Comparative History of Digital Futurities, in which he is looking at Islamic ideas of Information society, halal software and appropriation and localization of digital technology in an overt religious context. Together with Dr. Ariel Heryanto (Australian National University) Bart is editor of Southeast Asia Mediated, a 'KITLV Verhandelingen series' that is published with Brill Publishers.

Bart Barendregt is member of the academic committee of the conference Voices of Asian Modernities. The first conference was held from 4 till 6 September 2013. It is hosted by the research profile Asian Modernities and Traditions (AMT) within the project 'Women, Gender, and Sexuality in Asian Popular Music of the 20th Century'. The Voices of Asian Modernities project is a consortium between AMT, KITLV, and the University of Pittsburgh.

Keywords: Southeast Asia, anthropology of information society, Islam, popular culture

Philippines

  • Dr. Tessa Minter studied Development Sociology at Leiden University, where she graduated in 2001 on an MA thesis on the position of fruit farmers in a protected area in southern Thailand. Afterwards she took up a research position at the former field station of Leiden University (the Cagayan Valley Program on Environment and Development) in the Northeastern Philippines. There, she conducted ethnographic field work on hunter-gatherer livelihood strategies in a rapidly changing rain forest environment. This research resulted in Tessa’s PhD dissertation which she defended in 2010.

    In 2009-10 Tessa Minter held a four months post-doc position at the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) in Bogor, Indonesia, where she wrote about indigenous peoples’ position in logging and mining concessions, as well as in protected areas. After her return to Leiden University in early 2010 she has been teaching environmental anthropology, development sociology and political anthropology to undergraduate students. She is also involved in the supervision of PhD students.

    Tessa Minter's current research interests include indigenous participation in decision making processes, indigenous peoples’ health and food and water security in South East Asia, intercultural education and ethics.

    Keywords: Indigenous peoples, water security, South East Asia, Intercultural education, ethics, resilience of hunter-gatherers, environment and development.

  • Prof. Gerard Persoon holds the IIAS chair for Environment and Development in particular in relation to indigenous peoples in Southeast Asia. He has a background in anthropology and environmental science. His research focus is on human-environment interaction in various types of environments but mainly of forest-dwelling peoples in Indonesia and the Philippines. He has been involved in numerous research and training projects in the Southeast Asian region and he has also been involved in nature conservation projects. He has published on development processes among indigenous peoples, co-management and conservation of natural resources, and issues related to island societies.

    PhD research projects that are supervised by him include the role of indigenous peoples in biodiversity conservation and natural resource management in Indonesia, the Philippines and Taiwan, the exploitation of non-timber forest products, the management of marine and inland fisheries, and the modernization of pastoralism. He is a member of the Dutch governmental committee for sustainable timber and a number a other organizations in the field of environment and development.

    Keywords: Environmental anthropology, nature conservation, human-environment interactions, natural resources management

Other Regions